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DHEA May Help AMH Levels, Ovarian Reserve and IVF Procedure for Infertility Due to Premature Ovarian Failure

Recent research shows DHEA appears to improve AMH levels. DHEA appears to improve the ovarian reserve, and DHEA appears to improve the success rate of the IVF procedure for infertility due to premature ovarian failure. The Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Test is also called the Ovarian Reserve Test. The AMH test gives insight into the QUANTITY of eggs remaining and the likely number of fertile years that a woman has left to conceive. The AMH test is not an indicator of the QUALITY of the eggs. IVF Clinics would have you believe the AMH test is paramount for determining the urgency of proposed IVF procedures. IVF clinics tend to overstate the urgency of IVF procedures based on the AMH test. Research confirms that various substances increase the AMH result and increase the Ovarian Reserve thus boosting fertility by both natural means and also via the IVF Procedure. Thus research indicates that DHEA supplementation boosts fertility and the IVF success rate. DHEA may help diminished ovarian reserve, and other recent research indicates that DHEA may help premature ovarian failure. Further research shows that DHEA may reduce aneuploidy risks. Research concludes that DHEA appears to help improve AMH levels, increase Ovarian Reserve and improve the success rate for the IVF Procedure for Infertility Treatments.

Acupuncture has also been shown to increase the success rate of conceiving naturally and by IVF procedures. My name is Louis Gordon and I am a suitably qualified acupuncture practitioner. I practice acupuncture from ANTRAC Acupuncture Clinic in Middle Ridge, Toowoomba, 4350, Queensland, Australia. I have over 3 decades of fertility-enhancement acupuncture experience, and I can assist in all aspects associated with male and female Infertility Treatments and especially when used alongside the IVF Procedure. Call for more information on (07) 4636 6100.

 MISSION STATEMENT: “I aim to get my patients as WELL as possible, as quickly as possible, and then to keep them WELL”.

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DHEA for low ovarian reserve, low AMH and premature ovarian failure.

Ovarian Reserve Testing and IVF

Ovarian reserve tests can help to predict how well your ovaries are aging which can give you valuable information when planning fertility treatments. Test results can indicate how successful an IVF procedure might be, and help to determine the kinds of IVF protocols that may help to give you a better chance of conceiving successfully. Some clinics specialize in helping women with ovarian reserve issues and a diagnosis is the first step to getting the help you need.There are five tests which together help you to have a good peak at how your ovaries are doing, and they are best done on day 3 of your menstrual cycle:
1-Antimullarian hormone (AMH)
2-Inhibin B
3-FSH
4-Ovarian antral follicle count by ultrasound
5-Clomid challenge
dreamstime_m_18774922-0.80Ovarian reserve testing is especially indicated if you are over 35 years of age, or if you have an unusually high FSH for your age. An FSH under 10 is considered to be good by many fertility specialists, but if your FSH is close to ten when you are in your late twenties or early thirties, ovarian reserve testing may be useful to see if you have prematurely aging ovaries. If your FSH is between 8 and 10 ovarian reserve testing can be very useful to give a bigger picture of ovarian age. Many clinics do not offer ovarian reserve testing before IVF, and your first IVF cycle becomes a rather expensive test of how well your ovaries are doing. If your cycle shows poor IVF response – low number of eggs collected – you may be diagnosed with poor ovarian reserve and then be offered another IVF, more suited to your new diagnosis. Fortunately there is a simpler – and cheaper – way of getting this valuable information before you cycle.There is considerable merit in checking in on how your ovaries are aging through a batch of blood test instead of through a failed IVF cycle. Aside from the obvious cost benefits, a different IVF protocol – better suited to low ovarian reserve – can be chosen to help up the odds of success if your ovarian reserve problem is diagnosed BEFORE your first IVF.Physicians familiar with tweaking IVF cycles to optimize ovarian response may use protocols such as: a micro-dose lupron flare IVF protocol, an estrogen-priming IVF protocol, a combined cycle or an agonist cycle. All these cycle variants are used to help women have greater success when ovarian reserve is an issue. Choosing a physician who is VERY familiar with these cycles is your best option. Once you know that you have an ovarian reserve problem, other aspects of an IVF protocol become important to tease out before committing to where and how you should cycle. You need to do your homework.

It becomes more important than ever to check out – through SART or the CDC – how successful your clinic is with the 37 yr+ age group. Also, how successful is the clinic is in freezing and thawing embryos if you have extra? Choosing a clinic that uses vitrification means that you are very unlikely to lose any of your embryos as they thaw which becomes very important if you may have few to begin with.

IVF clinics have very variable frozen cycle success rates but they can be an important determinant of where you cycle. Some clinics such as CCRM (Colorado Center For Reproductive Medicine) have excellent success rates with women with poor ovarian reserve and are a good benchmark to become familiar with.

Wherever and whatever you choose remember that the things that you do to improve your fertility may be the greatest determinant of your success. Studies show that using a vitamin cocktail of melatonin, myo-inositol and other nutrients alongside a whole food organic diet could tip the odds further in your favor.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art9176.asp

 AMH Test Predicts IVF Success

AMH Test to determine ovarian reserve and female fertility.A simple ovarian hormone test performed before IVF can help predict the number of eggs that will be produced and help to fine-tune the dosages of gonadotropin hormones required for each woman. Select infertility clinics have been using this test for many years but a 2011 study is lending credence to the assay which may make it available to more women. The test may be a very valuable tool for helping to get IVF right the first time.

The test measures levels of an ovarian hormone called anti-mullarian hormone (AMH) which is thought by many to be a more accurate indicator of ovarian aging than the standard follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) test in common use. When the ovaries are young and vibrant they produce good levels of AMH and as ovaries age they produce less reflecting their inability to produce as many healthy eggs.

The 2011 study by researchers at Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Women’s & Infant’s Hospital demonstrated that testing antimullarian hormone (AMH) before IVF could predict the number of eggs that were produced in an IVF cycle. Lead researcher and co-author of the study Geralyn Lambert-Messerlain stated that;

“Clinicians can measure AMH before or during ovarian stimulation to counsel couples about their likelihood of success,”

The study measured the blood levels of AMH in 190 women aged 22-44 at the onset of the follicle stimulating phase of their IVF cycles. Women with AMH levels below 1 ng / ml which is considered low had an average of six eggs retrieved and about a quarter of them became pregnant. Women with high levels (three times the lower levels) had an average of twenty eggs retrieved and three out of five were pregnant at six weeks.

The study is to be published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

For many years I have encouraged my female clients to have their AMH levels tested – along with other ovarian hormones – and have found it to be invaluable in helping women to make better decisions about their fertility treatments. When AMH levels are found to be low reproductive endocrinologists are more likely to tailor an IVF cycle to the aging ovaries. IVF protocols such as the low-dose Lupron flare protocol and other protocols that avoid over-suppressing the ovaries are more likely to be chosen to help the ovaries to perform better. Higher doses of gonadotropins may also be used and a client may be more likely to choose a clinic that specializes in helping women with poor ovarian reserve to succeed.

When AMH testing – and other ovarian reserve tests – are skipped before fertility treatments the chance of an IVF cycle failing or being cancelled due to poor ovarian response may be increased. When prior AMH testing is not used the first IVF itself becomes a kind of ovarian reserve test: if the IVF is cancelled – or if a low number of eggs is produced – poor ovarian reserve may be diagnosed. The physician may then suggest that *next time* the IVF protocol will be changed to help their ovaries perform better. Testing before IVF can help you to get the right protocol first time and increase the chances of IVF being successful sooner, with less cost and heartache.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:
ScienceDaily accessed June 9 2011.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art31289.asp

Day 3 Testosterone May Predict IVF Outcome

When a woman has been diagnosed as being a poor responder – or has poor ovarian reserve – there is an increased risk that an IVF cycle may be cancelled due to poor response. Cancelled cycles can be very costly and frustrating but a 2011 study (1) has found a new way of predicting which women may have trouble getting to the egg retrieval and embryo transfer stages of IVF. This study discovered that a woman’s testosterone level on day three of her menstrual cycle can be very predictive of how her IVF will progress.

The study was extremely large following one-thousand two hundred and sixty Chinese women who were undergoing their first IVF who were free of endometriosis and PCOS. The women were divided into two groups: those who had diminished ovarian reserve (FSH>10 IU/L) comprising one hundred and eighty seven women and those with normal ovarian reserve. All women underwent the same IVF protocol.

Centrifuge to test AMH for fertility and egg quantity.In women with poor ovarian reserve a testosterone level greater than 47.85 ng/dl was able to predict pregnancy outcome (with a sensitivity of 52.8% and specificity of 65.3%). Day three testosterone was correlated with the numbers of mature follicles on the day of the hCG trigger and also indicated the total number of days of gonadotropin stimulation and the total dose of gonadotropins that would be required. The study concluded that:

“In women with diminished ovarian reserve, basal T (testosterone) level was a predictor for the number of large follicles on hCG day and pregnancy outcome; but could not in those with normal serum FSH.”

“Basal T (testosterone) levels were associated with both days of stimulation and total dose of gonadotropins, indicating that lower level of T might relate with potential ovarian poor response.”

Interestingly there have been recent studies showing that women with poor ovarian reserve who receive a pre-treatment phase of testosterone and DHEA (another androgen) have better IVF success rates. Your day three testosterone, if low, may indicate that you may benefit from some form of androgen pre-treatment to help your IVF to be more successful. The study further concludes that:

“Basal T level is a good predictor for pregnancy outcome and number of large follicles on hCG day in women with diminished ovarian reserve. Basal T level is equally helpful in tailoring the dosage of gonadotropins to individual and identifying potential poor ovarian responders, subsequently, making individualized COH (controlled ovarian hyperstimulation) strategy before entering IVF cycles. It also gives evidence to androgen supplementation in infertile women. Those women with lower basal T (testosterone) levels would benefit from T supplementation during COH such as improving response, decreasing the amount of gonadotropins used and the cost accordingly.”

Your doctor will usually evaluate your FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) and estradiol on day three to assess ovarian reserve before IVF, asking for a testosterone test too could help to fine-tune your IVF for greater success.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:

1. Association of basal serum testosterone levels with ovarian response and in vitro fertilization outcome
Qin, Yingying1; Zhao, Zhiyi1; Sun, Mei1; Geng, Ling1; Che, Li2; Chen, Zi-Jiang1
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology 2011, 9:9
ISSN: 1477-7827, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7827-9-9.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art174751.asp

DHEA May Help AMH Levels and Ovarian Reserve

One study (1) has shown that when DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) is supplemented prior to IVF in women with poor ovarian, reserve embryo quality and pregnancy rates increase. This study concluded that:

“DHEA treatment resulted in significantly higher cumulative pregnancy rates. These data support a beneficial effect of DHEA supplementation among women with diminished ovarian function.”

A 2010 study (2) – published in Reproductive Biomedicine Online – has furthered this research proving that the levels of anti-mullarian hormone (AMH) – known to represent ovarian reserve – are significantly improved also confirming the rejuvenating effect of DHEA on the ovary and female fertility.

When AMH levels are low IVF success rates are known to suffer compared to the rates of women with higher levels of AMH indicating a better quality of ovarian reserve.

In this study one hundred and twenty women with diminished ovarian reserve were supplemented with 25mg of DHEA three times a day for 30-120 days. AMH levels were found to significantly improve after treatment with DHEA, especially in women under 38 years of age.

AMH levels were found to improve longitudinally by an astonishing 60% and women who were able to pursue IVF had unexpectedly good success rates. The IVF success rates for women with poor Acupuncture and IVF help infertile couples have children.ovarian reserve who were pre-treated with DHEA were 23.64%. The women who conceived had experienced significantly greater improvements in AMH levels that those who did not have such improvements. The researchers concluded that:

“DHEA supplementation, thus, significantly improved ovarian reserve in parallel with longer DHEA use and was more pronounced in younger women.”

If you choose to take DHEA be sure to ask your physician who can prescribe a pharmaceutical grade DHEA. DHEA may be one of the most powerful ovary rejuvenating supplements to date.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:

1. J Assisted Reprod Genet. 2007 Dec;24(12):629-34. Epub 2007 Dec 11. Update on the use of dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation among women with diminished ovarian function. Barad D., et al.

2. Reprod Biomed Online. 2010 Sep;21(3):360-5. Epub 2010 Apr 18. Improvement in diminished ovarian reserve after dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation. Gleicher N, et al.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art172725.asp

DHEA Boosts Fertility and IVF Success

DHEA to help with infertility and poor AMH and low ovarian reserve.Taking the natural anti-aging hormone DHEA alongside infertility treatments such as IVF has previously been shown to give a remarkable boost to success rates – especially in women who have little chance of succeeding. In a new study the supplement was given alongside treatment to induce ovulation (not IVF) and continued for 5 months. For the first time DHEA demonstrated its ability to increase live birth rates.

Tel Aviv University researchers found that women who took 75 mg of DHEA per day for 40 days before their fertility treatments began were three times more likely to become pregnant than similar women without DHEA. The study was performed on 20 women aged 37 – 42 who had a history of poor quality ovulation.

DHEA had a positive effect upon the pregnancy too with all of the DHEA group having healthy deliveries. The women taking DHEA had a 23 percent take-home-baby rate compared to 4 percent in the women who did not receive the natural hormone which is a very good success rate for this age group.

Professor Shulman, the lead researcher stated that “We recommend that women try this DHEA treatment, in conjunction with fertility treatments, for four to five months,” but also cautions that you should consult your physician first. Further studies are planned to understand further how DHEA makes such a difference – “we need to look into what the drug actually does to make the body more fertile….it could be affecting components such as the quality of the eggs or the follicles.”

In a previous study on IVF 25 women all with poor ovarian reserve were given two identical IVF cycles, one IVF cycle without – and one with DHEA supplementation. DHEA was given for approximately 4 months at 75 mg per day (25 mg three times a day) prior to and during IVF ovarian stimulation. The women in this study had day-3 FSH levels ranging from 3 to 20.

When the results were analyzed, the DHEA supplemented IVF cycles produced significantly more fertilized oocytes, more normal day 3 embryos and more good-quality embryos. The study concluded that “this study confirms the previously reported beneficial effects of DHEA supplementation on ovarian function in women with diminished ovarian reserve.”

In a smaller study of just five poor-responder patients 80 mg of DHEA was given for two months and continued during ovarian stimulation. Peak estradiol levels were significantly higher in the DHEA / IVF cycles and one of the women gave birth to twins. The study concluded that “supplemental DHEA treatment during ovarian stimulation may represent a novel way to maximize ovarian response.”

DHEA is available as an over the counter supplement in the USA without a prescription. If you are pursuing fertility treatments and are suspected of having poor egg quality, DHEA may tip the odds in your favor.

This article is for purely educational and informational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical diagnosis and advice for which you should consult a physician.

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REFERENCES:
July 25 2010, Daily Express, UK, ‘ANTI-AGEING HORMONE PILL BOOSTS PREGNANCY’

Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone on oocyte and embryo yields, embryo grade and cell numbers in IVF. Human Reproduction. Vol. 21, Issue 11, Pp. 2845-2849. Barad and Gleicher.

Dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation augments ovarian stimulation in poor responders: a case series. Hum Reprod 2000;15:2129-2132. Casson et al.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art17793.asp

DHEA May Help Diminished Ovarian Reserve

Some of the top fertility clinics with high success rates are using a supplement of the adrenal hormone DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) to boost pregnancy and take-home-baby rates in women with diminished ovarian reserve.

In a study (1) – published in the Journal of Assisted Reproductive Genetics – 190 women with poor ovarian reserve were observed as they pursued IVF. Eighty nine of the women took 75 mg of DHEA helps low ovarian reserve and low AMH result so conception is possible.micronized DHEA a day for up to four months prior to IVF while the remaining women acted as controls. The results of the study showed that clinical pregnancy rates were significantly higher in the group of women who were pre-treated with DHEA (28%) compared with the control group (12%) and the researchers concluded that:

“DHEA treatment resulted in significantly higher cumulative pregnancy rates. These data support a beneficial effect of DHEA supplementation among women with diminished ovarian function.”

Greek researchers (2) came to a similar conclusion; they suggest that taking between 50 and 75 mg of DHEA for at least 4 months may considerably help to improve the success rates of IUI and IVF – or encourage natural conception especially in women with poor ovarian reserve, premature ovarian failure or premature ovarian aging.

The researchers also highlighted how improvements in egg quality and embryo quality were observed even in older women between aged 40 and 47 years, increasing the numbers of euploid (chromosomally normal) embryos and dropping miscarriage rates. The Greek researchers concluded that:

“Although more data on the dehydroepiandrosterone effect on assisted reproduction are needed, results obtained over the last few years confirm the improvement of oocyte production and pregnancy rates. No significant side effects are reported, and those include mainly hirsutism and acne.”

Other studies have shown that DHEA can reduce the risk of aneuploidy which is yet another reason why women with poor ovarian reserve often consider pre-treatment with DHEA. Further studies have shown that DHEA pre-treatment can significantly reduce miscarriage risks in women with poor ovarian reserve to the levels associated with healthy fertile women – about 15%. This is quite remarkable given that women with ovarian reserve issues tend to be at higher risk for miscarriage. In many ways DHEA seems to have a rejuvenating effect on oocytes and embryos combating the aging process and giving women in their thirties and forties – especially those with diminished ovarian reserve – new hope for a successful pregnancy and a healthy baby. You should always ask your physician before beginning DHEA treatment. DHEA can be prescribed and monitored by your physician.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:

1. J Assit Reprod Genet. 2007 Dec;24(12):629-34. Epub 2007 Dec 11.
Update on the use of dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation among women with diminished ovarian function. Barad D. et al.,
2. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Aug;21(4):306-8. Dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation in assisted reproduction: rationale and results. Mamas L, Mamas E.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art172719.asp

DHEA May Help Premature Ovarian Failure

DHEA helps low ovarian reserve and poor AMH results.In premature ovarian failure it is often assumed that natural conception or conception with IVF/ART may not be possible and donor eggs are often suggested as the only solution. However, a number of studies have explored innovative treatments that may enable some women with premature ovarian failure to conceive and have babies using their own eggs.

A Greek study – published in Fertility and Sterility – extolls the benefits of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal steroid hormone which can have a profound anti-aging effect on the eggs and embryos of women with poor ovarian reserve.

The researchers of this study had one successful birth subsequent to pre-conceptual DHEA treatment (75 mg a day in three doses of 25 mg) in a woman with premature ovarian failure. They then proceeded to offer this treatment to all their patients presenting with premature ovarian failure who desired to conceive.

The results of this treatment strategy were extremely promising, dropping FSH levels (a marker of ovarian reserve) in the first five patients who all went on to become pregnant subsequent to DHEA treatment. The researchers state that:

“Since the first successful birth at our center following treatment with DHEA in a patient with premature ovarian failure (POF), all subsequent patients with POF underwent the same treatment protocol. Receiving very encouraging results (FSH level was decreased in the first five patients and all achieved pregnancy).”

Other studies on DHEA have shown that pre-treatment with 75 mg of DHEA a day can drop the miscarriage rates of women with diminished ovarian reserve to those of a healthy younger woman. DHEA treatment has also been shown to increase IVF success rates in women with diminished ovarian reserve and to reduce aneuploidy a leading cause of miscarriage and birth defects.

If you are determined to try and conceive with your own eggs and have declining AMH levels and increasing FSH values DHEA may offer a novel way to restore egg quality and speed conception. It is important to ask your doctor about this treatment because it should be monitored carefully to ensure that testosterone levels do not elevate adversely and to monitor side-effects, your physician can prescribe the DHEA to ensure that you are taking a safe product.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:
Fertil Steril. 2009 Feb;91(2):644-6. Epub 2008 Mar 5. Premature ovarian failure and dehydroepiandrosterone. Mamas L, Mamas E.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art172791.asp

DHEA May Reduce Aneuploidy Risks

Aneuploidy is a term used to describe an abnormality of cell division where too few or too many chromosomes are present; aneuploidy is the cause of Down’s Syndrome which is also called trisomy 21, and other birth defects which may or may not result in miscarriage. The risk of aneuploidy increases greatly with age and few strategies – aside from folic acid – have been shown to genuinely reduce risk.

ICSI procedure for IVF infertility procedurePrior studies on DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone) have demonstrated increased pregnancy rates and decreased miscarriage rates – by 50-80% – in women with diminished ovarian reserve. Inevitably this effect is thought to be due to a protective effect on cell division and chromosomes which could reduce the incidence of aneuploidy.

To test this theory, researchers studied twenty two women with diminished ovarian reserve who were supplemented with DHEA prior to IVF and subsequently had pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) performed on their embryos to check for aneuploidy. Each woman was matched to two similarly aged control also undergoing IVF and PGS.

Amazingly the DHEA supplementation was demonstrated to significantly decrease the number of aneuploid embryos. Interestingly DHEA supplementation was most effective when given for a very short time (four to twelve weeks) and the amount given was 25 mg three times a day which is similar to the dose used in previous studies. The researchers concluded that:

“Beneficial DHEA effects on DOR (diminished ovarian reserve) patients, at least partially, are the likely consequence of lower embryo aneuploidy. DHEA supplementation also deserves investigation in older fertile women, attempting to conceive, where a similar effect, potentially, could positively affect public health.”

The researchers also noted that DHEA may benefit fertile patients conceiving naturally without ART/IVF and suggest that this could help by:

“…speeding up time to pregnancy and by reducing embryo aneuploidy and miscarriage rates.”

If you choose to use DHEA there are some possible side-effects mainly limited to hirsutism but others are possible such as hair loss. Be sure to ask your physician first, this is a high dose and is best prescribed and supervised by a physician to ensure that you are using pure DHEA at a reliable dose.

This article is for purely informational purposes and is not intended to replace medical diagnosis or advice.

Would you like articles like this delivered to your email weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly newsletter, it is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) reduces embryo aneuploidy: direct evidence from preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) Norbert Gleicher, et al., Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology 2010, 8:140 doi:10.1186/1477-7827-8-140

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art172723.asp

Prednisone and Premature Ovarian Failure

If you have premature ovarian failure and are trying to conceive there are a number of novel treatment strategies that have been shown to help. This Canadian study – published in Fertility and Sterility – explores the merit of treating premature ovarian failure with prednisone, a steroid hormone which has in previous studies been shown to increase ovarian responsiveness to stimulation.

The study used a high-dose but short-term burst of steroids to restart ovarian follicle production with some success. Eleven women diagnosed with infertility and premature ovarian failure received 25 mg of prednisone four times a day for two weeks which is considered a high dose.

Interestingly two of the women had an increase in estradiol, normalized gonadotropins and had evidence of ovarian follicles when examined by ultrasound. Both conceived. The other women in the study did not experience any changes to their hormones or ovaries and did not conceive but the study showed that for some, steroid treatment may restore ovulation and enable conception, the researchers concluded that:

“Premature ovarian failure (POF) may not be an irreversible (i.e. may be a reversable) process and may either spontaneously resolve or may respond to therapeutic modalities such as high-dose glucocorticoids in selected patients. In this uncontrolled study, the results were best with women with concomitant autoimmune thyroid disease and POF of < 2 years’ duration.”

Other studies have shown that women with autoimmune thyroid disease are more likely to also have an autoimmune ovarian disease which is marked by the production of anti-ovarian antibodies (AOAs). In such women it is possible for steroids to suppress the autoimmune activity in the ovary allowing the ovary to restore function. Other strategies of merit include the use of DHEA in relatively high doses which have also been shown to rejuvenate the ovaries of some women with poor ovarian reserve and premature ovarian failure.

This article is simply for informational and educational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for medical advice or nutritional advice for which you should consult a suitably qualified physician and / or licensed dietician.

Would you like articles like this emailed to your weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter. It is free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. The link is below.

REFERENCES:

Fertil Steril. 1993 May;59(5):988-91. High-dose, short-term glucocorticoids for the treatment of infertility resulting from premature ovarian failure. Corenblum B, et al.

http://thefertilityconnection.com/

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art172724.asp

Testosterone Offers New Hope for IVF Success

Many women have the frustrating experience of pursuing costly IVF procedures only to have their cycles cancelled and their hopes dashed when poor ovarian response to stimulation eventuates in them being diagnosed as a ‘poor responder’. Even when massive doses of gonadotropin stimulants are used, some women’s ovaries seem recalcitrant to stimulation and do not produce follicles as expected. Many strategies have been pursued to find novel ways of boosting the ovarian response of poor responders. Testosterone is one such strategy that may give such women new hope.

Historically, a number of studies have been performed on the benefits of giving poor responders testosterone prior to IVF as a means of improving IVF response. The results have been very positive thus far.

In a 2011 South Korean study, poor-responder women were given a transdermal testosterone gel before ovarian stimulation began. In this study poor responders were defined as women who had failed during previous IVF cycles to produce more than 3 follicles over 16 mm diameter, despite high gonadotropin stimulation.

The 110 women were randomized to receive either transdermal testosterone pre-treatment with 12.5 mg daily for 21 days in the cycle preceding the IVF or a placebo. The results of the study showed that the women who received testosterone pre-treatment needed less gonadotropin stimulation and had a significantly higher number of oocytes retrieved. They also had more mature oocytes that fertilized and more high-quality embryos.

The testosterone-pretreated women also had a higher pregnancy rate and there were no adverse effects from the male hormone treatment. The researchers concluded that:
“TTG pretreatment might be beneficial in improving both response to COS and IVF outcome in low responders undergoing IVF/ICSI.”

This study echoes the findings of previous studies that have likewise found that pretreatment with testosterone can offer poor-responder women a novel, inexpensive and low-risk way to up the odds of IVF succeeding.

Would you like articles like this delivered to your email weekly? Sign up for the BellaOnline weekly infertility newsletter, it’s free and you can unsubscribe anytime you like. See the link below.

REFERENCES:
Fertil Steril. 2011 Feb;95(2):679-83.
The effect of transdermal testosterone gel pretreatment on controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF outcome in low responders. Kim CH, Howles CM, Lee HA.

This article was extracted from http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art8952.asp

Hannah Calef Fertility Expert These articles have been reproduced with permission from the author Hannah Calef (BellaOnline’s Infertility Editor).
 The articles have been reproduced in  entirity  from http://thefertilityconnection.com/. Hannah’s personal website is http://thefertilityconnection.com/
 Hannah is a Fellow of the American Board of Oriental Reproductive Medicine and has specialized in infertility since 2002.

Acupuncture Infertility Treatments and IVF Procedure in Toowoomba Video

DISCLAIMER
The information and opinions expressed on this website are in no way a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You must consult with your fertility specialist, pharmacist, or health care provider before implementing any suggestions or taking any supplements or following any treatment advice suggested by information on this site. Only your personal health care provider, your personal physician, or your pharmacist can supply you with advice that is deemed safe and effective for your individual health needs or diagnose medical conditions based on your personal medical history.

Accupuncture, Acupunture or Accupunture common misspelling

Note that “Acupuncture” is often misspelt as accupuncture, acupunture or accupunture, that is with either too many c’s or not enough c’s. I would love to be able to clear up this very common spelling mistake, and set the record straight.

Ac·u·punc·ture – pronounced ak-yoo-puhngk-cher; Origin: 1675–85; < Latin acū with a needle (ablative of acus  needle) or acu- (as combining form of acus ) + puncture.

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